best alternative to a negotiated agreement

Or BATNA, describes a negotiator’s best possible outcome if the current negotiations fail.

The following items are tagged best alternative to a negotiated agreement.

International Negotiations: A Game of Chess…or Marbles?

Posted by & filed under International Negotiation.

Many observers view Russian president Vladimir Putin’s decision to send Russian troops into Crimea in the wake of violence between protesters and police in Kiev and Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovich’s abrupt departure as the first gambit in a carefully reasoned strategy.

“Putin is playing chess and I think we are playing marbles, and I don’t think it’s even close,” said Representative Mike Rogers, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, in criticism of President Barack Obama and his administration. Arguing that Putin’s advance into Ukraine is part of a plan to strengthen Russia’s “buffer zones,” Rogers accused the Obama administration for making too many concessions to Russia and failing to respond decisively to the crisis.

Dealing with Difficult People—Such As Putin?

Posted by & filed under BATNA.

In negotiation, we are often confronted with the task of dealing with difficult people—those who seem to prefer to set up roadblocks rather than break down walls, or who choose to take hardline stances rather than seeking common ground.

How can you deal with such difficult people?

One tactic you might consider is avoiding the conversation altogether by finding more collaborative negotiating partners, but this is not always an option.

When avoidance is impossible, strengthening your best alternative to a negotiated agreement (BATNA) can help give you the confidence you need to deal with obstinacy among negotiating partners.

Frustrated by an Uninformed Negotiator? Consider Your BATNA

Posted by & filed under BATNA.

As the lead negotiator in 18 months of top-secret talks with Iran over its nuclear program, U.S. State Department Under Secretary for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman found herself negotiating as if through a dark screen. Rather than dealing directly with Iran’s supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, the United States delegation led by Sherman was assigned to interact with Iran’s American-educated foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, the New York Times reports.

During the course of the discussions, it remained unclear exactly how much negotiating authority Zarif possessed, if any. “We are only going to find out by testing him,” Sherman said. She found the drawn-out process of “signal-sending” with Iran frustrating, the Times reports.

Most of us have had the experience of doubting a counterpart’s ability to make decisions on behalf of his organization. Fortunately, business negotiators typically have more options than Sherman did to improve the situation. Here are three guidelines

NEW! Negotiation Strategies for Women: Secrets to Success

Posted by & filed under Freemium.

As a general manager of a business unit and the father of two daughters in college, I have no tolerance for gender bias in the workplace or anywhere else for that matter. At least that’s what I thought, until a women manager handed me the Negotiation Strategies for Women report that she recently received from the Program on Negotiation.

I read it cover to cover and was startled by what I learned – that double standards and obstacles still exist for women professionals to advocate for themselves. I met with my HR manager and together we scrutinized our business. We realized that we were unintentionally perpetuating gender inequality.

Discover how to collaborate, negotiate, and bargain with even the most combative opponents. In Dealing With Difficult People, you’ll gain actionable strategies for:

Dealing with people who won’t give you what you want

Holding your ground in difficult situations

Negotiating effectively in the face of adversity

Top 10 Negotiation Failures of 2013

Posted by & filed under Negotiation Skills.

Here’s a list of some of the most notable negotiation flops of the past year – from deals that were over before they started, to those that were botched at the table, to those that proved disastrous well after the ink had dried.

The CBS – Time Warner Cable Dispute: Making a Bad BATNA Even Worse

Posted by & filed under BATNA.

On October 31, Time Warner Cable reported a huge quarterly loss of television subscribers, the largest in its history: 306,000 of its 11.7 million subscribers dropped the company, the New York Times reports. The bad news has been attributed largely to an impasse with television network CBS over fees, which led to Time Warner blacking

NEW! Dealing with Difficult People

Posted by & filed under Freemium.

At the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School (PON), we are dedicated to helping professionals deal with hard bargainers and resolve even the most challenging disputes. To help you understand the principles of negotiation and conflict resolution, we put together a special report: Dealing With Difficult People.

Discover how to collaborate, negotiate, and bargain with even the most combative opponents. In Dealing With Difficult People, you’ll gain actionable strategies for:

Dealing with people who won’t give you what you want

Holding your ground in difficult situations

Negotiating effectively in the face of adversity

The Deal is Done – Now What?

Posted by & filed under Conflict Management.

At last, the deal is done. After 18 months of negotiation, eight trips across the country, and countless meetings, you’ve finally signed a contract creating a joint venture with a Silicon Valley firm to manufacture imaging devices using your technology and their engineering.

The contract is clear and precise. It covers all the contingencies and has strong enforcement mechanisms. You’ve given your company a solid foundation for a profitable new business. As you file the contract, a question dawns on you: Now what?