Event Date: Tuesday November 10, 2009
Time: 4:00-6:00PM
Location: CGIS Building, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, 1737 Cambridge Street, Second Floor, N-262 (Bowie Vernon Room), Cambridge MA

Conflict in Global Finance After the Meltdown:

Reconciling Competing Priorities

with

Richard Parker

Lecturer on Public Policy

Shorenstein Center, Harvard Kennedy School

Date: November 10, 2009

Time: 4-6 PM

Where: CGIS Building, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs,

1737 Cambridge Street, Second Floor, N-262 (Bowie Vernon Room), Cambridge MA

Contact Chair: Donna Hicks (dhicks@wcfia.harvard.edu).

Speaker Bio

Richard Parker is Lecturer in Public Policy and Senior Fellow of the Shorenstein Center. An economist by training, he is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Oxford University. He has worked as an economist for the UNDP, as cofounder of Mother Jones Magazine, and as head of his own consulting firm, serving congressional clients, including Senators Kennedy, Glenn, Cranston, and McGovern, among others. Parker has held Marshall, Rockefeller, Danforth, Goldsmith, and Bank of America Fellowships. His books include: The Myth of the Middle Class, a study of U.S. Mixed Signals: The Future of Global Television News; and the intellectual biography, John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics. His articles have appeared in numerous academic anthologies and journals and in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, Nation, Harper’s, Le Monde, Atlantic Monthly, and International Economy, among others.

About the Herbert C. Kelman Seminar Series

The 2009-2010 Herbert C. Kelman Seminar on International Conflict Analysis and Resolution series is sponsored by the Program on Negotiation, the Nieman Foundation for Journalism, the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy, The Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the MIT-Harvard Public Disputes Program, as well as Boston area members of the Alliance for Peacebuilding. The theme for this year’s Kelman Seminar is “Reconciliation: Coming together after the shooting stops”

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