Rebuilding the World Trade Center Site

original

Lawrence Susskind

A group of legal, business, and dispute resolution professionals negotiate a six-person, facilitated role simulation regarding the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site in New York City, following the 9/11/2001 terrorist attacks

 

This video shows a group of legal, business, and dispute resolution professionals negotiating the six-person, facilitated role simulation entitled World Trade Center Redevelopment Negotiation (also available from the Teaching Negotiation Resource Center) regarding the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site in New York City, following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Professor Lawrence Susskind of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) introduces and debriefs the exercise, and F. Peter Phillips of the International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (CPR) provides additional commentary. The setting is the January 2007 CPR Annual Meeting in New York City, attended by a number of experienced attorneys, mediators, and judges.

 

The video includes three primary sections:

(1) An introduction (Chapter 1: approximately 14 minutes), in which Professor Susskind discusses the purposes of the exercise (primarily, to highlight the challenges associated with multi-party, multi-issue negotiations in the public arena), provides summary background information about the terrorist attacks on the World trade Center on September 11, 2001, describes the six roles and four issues to be negotiated in the World Trade Center Redevelopment Negotiation exercise, offers some preliminary observations about the dynamics of complex multiparty negotiation, and provides instructions for participating in the exercise.

(2) A demonstration of one group of six CPR Annual Meeting attendees negotiating the World trade Center Redevelopment Negotiation exercise for the first time (Chapters 2 – 9; approximately 39 minutes). This negotiation is unscripted and unrehearsed. It has been edited for time, but every effort has been made to preserve the overall flow of the actual negotiation. This segment is particularly interesting because it frequently depicts simultaneous interactions, sometimes by using a split screen to show multiple participants in the same meeting, and sometimes by sequentially showing meetings of sub-groups of participants that actually occurred simultaneously.

A debriefing of the exercise, led by Professor Susskind, and a summary of the primary lessons (Chapters 10-11; approximately 14 minutes).

 

The video may be used for a number of purposes:

(1) For teachers or trainers interested in using the underlying role simulation exercise (World Trade Center Redevelopment Negotiation) in their classes, the entire video can be used for self-study, as it demonstrates an effective approach to running and debriefing the exercise. The World Trade Center Redevelopment Negotiation exercise is available from the Program on Negotiation’s Teaching Negotiation Resource Center at www.pon.org.

(2) For teachers or trainers who use the World Trade Center Redevelopment Negotiation exercise in their classes, the portion of the video showing one group negotiating the exercise (Chapters 2-9; approximately 39 minutes) can be used for purposes of comparison with the students’ own negotiation experiences.

(3) For teachers and trainers of mediation, facilitation, public disputes, and/or multiparty negotiation dynamics (such as process management, coalition building, and caucusing), either the entire video or the portion of the DVD showing one group negotiating the exercise (Chapters 2-9; approximately 39 minutes), can be used for demonstration and discussion purposes.

(4) For mediators, facilitators, urban planners, attorneys, executives who engage in complex negotiations, and/or anyone else interested in learning more about mediation, facilitation, public disputes, and/or multiparty negotiation dynamics (such as process management, coalition building, and caucusing), the entire DVD can be used for self-study purposes.

 

Rebuilding the World Trade Center Site Attributes

Time required:
Unspecified
Teaching notes available:
No
Produced by:
Run Time:
71 Minutes

PON Teaching Negotiation Resource Center

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Soft copy vs. hard copy

You may order this role simulation in either soft copy (electronic) or hard copy (paper) format. If you select the soft copy option, you will receive an e-mail with a URL (website address) from which you may download an electronic file in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. You will have one week to download your materials from when you receive the email. You are then only authorized to use, print, or share the materials as many times as the number of copies you purchase. The TNRC charges for use of this simulation on a per-participant basis. Therefore, you must purchase a separate copy of this simulation for each person who will be participating, regardless of the number of roles in the simulation. You will only receive a link to one electronic file, which includes all general instructions, confidential instructions, and any teaching notes for the simulation. You should separate out the instructions before distributing to participants.

If you select the hard copy option, you will receive paper copies of this role simulation via the shipping method you select.

For additional information about the soft copy option, please visit our FAQ section, or contact the PON Teaching Negotiation Resource Center at tnrc@law.harvard.edu or 800-258-4406 (within the U.S.) or 301-528-2676 (outside the U.S.).

Please note: At the present time, Teaching Negotiation Resource Center soft copies are compatible with the following versions of the Adobe Acrobat Reader: English, German, French, Spanish, Swedish, Portuguese, Japanese, and Korean. If you have a different version of the Acrobat Reader, you may wish to download one of these at http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html, or contact the PON Teaching Negotiation Resource Center at tnrc@law.harvard.edu, 800-258-4406 (within the U.S.), or 301-528-2676 (outside the U.S.) for further assistance. This restriction does not apply to the freely available Teacher’s Package Review Copies.

Ordering a single copy for review

If you wish to review the materials for a particular role simulation to decide whether you’d like to use it, a PDF, or soft copy, version of the Teacher’s Package for the simulation is available as a free download from the description page of most role simulations and case studies. All Teacher’s Packages include copies of all participant materials. In addition, some Teacher’s Packages (but not all) include additional teaching materials such as teaching notes or overhead masters.

Ordering copies for multiple participants

To order multiple copies of a role simulation for use in a course or workshop, simply enter the total number of participants in the box next to “Quantity.” There is no need to calculate how many of each role is required.

If you are ordering hard copies, the Teaching Negotiation Resource Center will calculate the appropriate numbers of each role to provide, based on the total number of participants. For example, if you wish to order a 2-party role simulation for use with a class of 30 students, you would enter “30” in the box next to “Quantity.” You then would receive 15 copies of one role and 15 copies of the other role, for use with your 30 participants. As another example, if you ordered 30 participant copies of a 6-party role simulation, you would receive 5 copies of each role.

In the event that the number of participant copies you order is not evenly divisible by the number of roles in the simulation, you will receive extra copies of one or more roles. Participants receiving the extra roles may partner with other participants playing the same role, thus negotiating as a team. So, for instance, if you ordered 31 copies of a 2-party role simulation, you would receive 15 copies of the first role and 16 copies of the second role. One of the participants playing the second role would partner with another participant playing that same role, and the two would negotiate as a team.