BATNA

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. The true measure by which you should judge any proposed agreement. It is the only standard which can protect you both from accepting terms that are too unfavorable and from rejecting terms it would be in your interest to accept. (Roger Fisher and William Ury, Getting to Yes [Penguin … Read More 

brainstorming

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

A free-flowing session in which ideas for solutions are generated by both parties. Ideas should not be evaluated during the brainstorming session, and parties should not take ownership of ideas. The goal of a brainstorming session is to liberate those at the table to suggest ideas. (Robert H. Mnookin, Scott R. Peppet and Andrew S. … Read More 

circle of value

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

An approach used to find creative ways to satisfy as many shared and differing interests as possible. The approach is characterized by exploring options without commitments (or threats), using interests and standards of legitimacy to explore ways to create and distribute value, and the parties’ avoiding becoming a voice of authority. Also see “problem-solving approach.” … Read More 

coalition

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

Structures that become possible when three or more parties negotiate, and parties ally together to exploit or buy off each other. Coalition dynamics can arise across the table (between parties in a dispute) or behind the table (among individuals on one side or the other). (David A. Lax and James K. Sebenius) … Read More 

commitment

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

An agreement, demand, offer, or promise by one or more parties, and any formalization of that agreement. Commitment is commonly signaled by words such as, “I will offer,” I demand,” “We agree,” or “I promise not to…” Commitments can occur at any point in a negotiation and encompass anything from a minor procedural point (for … Read More 

communication

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

The process by which parties discuss and deal with the elements of a negotiation. (Michael L. Moffitt and Robert C. Bordone, eds., Handbook of Dispute Resolution [Program on Negotiation/Jossey-Bass, 2005], 284) … Read More 

competition

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

An approach to negotiation that emphasizes assertiveness over empathy. Competitive negotiators have winning as a goal, and enjoy feeling purposeful and in control. They also may seek to control the agenda and frame the issues in a negotiation, perhaps resorting to intimidation or bullying to get the biggest slice of the pie. (Robert H. Mnookin, … Read More 

concessions

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

The things one side gives up in order to deescalate or resolve a conflict. They may simply be points in an argument, a reduction in demands, or a softening of one side’s position. (from http://www.colorado.edu/conflict/peace/glossary.htm) … Read More 

conciliation

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

Efforts by a third party to improve the relationship between two or more disputants. It may be done as a part of mediation, or independently. Generally, the third party will work with the disputants to correct misunderstandings, reduce fear and distrust, and generally improve communication between the parties in conflict. Sometimes this alone will result … Read More 

conflict transformation

PON Staff   •  02/17/2009   •  Filed in Glossary

A change (usually an improvement) in the nature of a conflict, a de-escalation or a reconciliation between people or groups. The concept of conflict transformation reflects the notion that conflicts go on for long periods of time, changing the nature of the relationships between the people involved, and themselves changing as people’s response to the … Read More 

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