sheila heen

The following items are tagged sheila heen.

Hong Kong Lawyer Benny Tai Inspired by Harvard Negotiation Project Authors

Posted by & filed under Teaching Negotiation.

The Harvard Negotiation Project was recently mentioned in the Wall Street Journal by David Feith in his interview with Benny Tai, “China’s New Freedom Fighters.”

Benny Tai, a 49 year old lawyer who has been branded an “enemy of the state,” founded Occupy Central with Love and Peace, a group that promotes civil disobedience in order to promote free elections in Hong Kong.

Among Tai’s inspirations include works from the Program on Negotiation’s Harvard Negotiation Project.

The Limits of Emotional Intelligence as a Negotiation Skill

Posted by & filed under Negotiation Skills.

The concept of emotional intelligence burst into the cultural imagination in 1995 with the publication of psychologist Daniel Goleman’s bestselling book of the same name. Experts have predicted that scoring high on this personality trait would boost one’s bargaining outcomes. After all, the qualities that characterize emotional intelligence—awareness of our emotions and how they affect others, the ability to regulate our moods and behavior, empathy, the motivation to meet meaningful personal goals, and strong social skills—seem as if they’d help us get what we want from others and find common ground.

Should emotional intelligence be included among the most essential negotiation skills? In a new study, researchers Kihwan Kim (Buena Vista University), Nicole L. A. Cundiff (the University of Alaska, Fairbanks), and Suk Bong Choi (the University of Ulsan, South Korea) sought to determine whether emotional intelligence correlates with beneficial negotiation outcomes, namely trust building, the desire to work together in the future, and joint gain.

Conflict Management at the Office

Posted by & filed under Conflict Management.

Are you too eager to please? A desire to get along with others may be preventing you from addressing conflict in your workplace – and preventing you from advancing, writes Joann S. Lublin in a recent Wall Street Journal article.

Increasingly, employers are hiring and promoting leaders who are skilled at coping with conflict rather than avoiding it, according to Judith Glaser, the author of the new book Conversational Intelligence.

In an attempt to combat a culture of “artificial harmony,” for example, Southwest Airlines is now actively seeking to promote middle managers to executive positions based in part on their ability to bring conflict to the surface and work through it openly.

South Africa’s “Negotiated Revolution” and Mandela’s Legacy: A Conversation with Roelf Meyer and Tim Phillips

Posted by & filed under Events.

Rm and Phillips

The Program on Negotiation is pleased to present:

South Africa’s “Negotiated Revolution” and Mandela’s Legacy
with
Roelf Meyer
Former Chief Negotiator for President DeKlerk in the talks to end Apartheid
Former Minister of Constitutional Affairs and Former Minister of Defense, South Africa
and
Tim Phillips
Co-Founder of Beyond Conflict (formerly the Project on Justice in Times of Transition)
Moderated by

Bruce Patton
Distinguished Fellow of

Negotiation Skills: Giving Feedback. Who Needs It? It Might Be You

Posted by & filed under Negotiation Skills.

A Q&A with Sheila Heen, co-author (with Douglas Stone) of the new book, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well.

We recently interviewed Sheila Heen, lecturer at Harvard Law School, PON Faculty member, and Partner at Triad Consulting Group, about her new book with Douglas Stone, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered, and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood). Heen and Stone are co-authors, along with Bruce Patton, of the New York Times Business Bestseller Difficult Conversations. They have teamed up again to share their insights about what helps people learn and what gets in their way.

While the business world spends billions of dollars and millions of hours each year teaching us how to give feedback, Stone and Heen argue that we’ve got it backwards. Their new book demonstrates why the smart money is on educating receivers— both in the workplace and in personal relationships.

Doug Stone and Sheila Heen’s new book “Thanks for the Feedback” – Book Discussion and Signing

Posted by & filed under Events, harvard negotiation project.

9780670922611

Join us as Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project discuss their latest book, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well. This event is hosted by the Harvard Book Store.
 

 
Tuesday, March 4th
6:00 – 7:30 PM
Brattle Theatre
40 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA
Entry is $5 – buy your tickets here.
 

We swim

Winning From Within: A Discussion with Erica Fox

Posted by & filed under Events.

The New England Chapter of the Association for Conflict Resolution and the Program on Negotiation are pleased to co-present:

Winning From Within: A Discussion with Erica Fox

 
Monday, October 21, 2013
4:00 – 5:15 PM
Pound Hall 101
Harvard Law School Campus

About the Event:
Join the New England Association for Conflict Resolution and the Program on Negotiation for a book talk

HNLR Symposium Review: “Ideas and Impact: Roger Fisher’s Legacy”

Posted by & filed under Dispute Resolution, Events, Videos.

On March 2, 2013, the Harvard Negotiation Law Review held their 2013 Symposium, entitled “Ideas and Impact: Roger Fisher’s Legacy.” This event celebrated Professor Fisher, co-founder of the Harvard Negotiation Project and the Program on Negotiation. Professor Fisher passed away last summer.

During the day-long event, distinguished panelists explored current trends and opportunities for aspiring scholars

Conflict Resolution Lessons from the Home: How Conflict Management Skills Transform Discord Into Harmony

Posted by & filed under Conflict Resolution.

In Lessons in Life Diplomacy, the New York Times’ Bruce Feiler asks, how do we break out of negative patterns of conduct and proactively approach problems encountered in our everyday lives? His advice, gleaned from his own experiences as well as from the research of experts in the field of conflict management and dispute resolution, is actually quite simple on its face yet very complex in practice.

Think Like a Mediator

Posted by & filed under Mediation.

To set the stage for a productive discussion, open a difficult conversation with the Third Story, advise the authors of Difficult Conversations. The Third Story is one an impartial observer, such as a mediator, would tell; it’s a version of events both sides can agree on. “The key is learning to describe the gap – or difference – between your story and the other person’s story. Whatever else you may think and feel, you can at least agree that you and the other person see things differently,” Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen write.