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January 2015

January 2015

- Dealing with difficult people. We sometimes have strong incentives to negotiate with someone we find to be obstinate, unpredictable, abrasive, untrustworthy, or all of the above. If we choose not to negotiate with them, we could miss out on important business opportunities or a chance to end a lingering conflict. If we do negotiate with them, we could end up worse off than when we started. Fortunately, there are strategies we can employ to induce more collaborative and trustworthy behavior from even the most difficult negotiators.
- Share the wealth wisely. Many of us fail to negotiate the gifts we give on behalf of ourselves or our organizations. But when we don’t negotiate a gift, we may end up feeling disappointed in the recipient and in ourselves when the gift isn’t appreciated or used as we’d intended. We offer advice on how to negotiate gifts that achieve as much as they possibly can.
- Dear Negotiation Coach: Asking for help. In business negotiations, the fear of seeming incompetent may keep us from asking for help from our colleagues and counterparts. Our Negotiation Coach for this issue, Harvard Business School professor Francesca Gino, explains why this fear is unfounded—and why advice seekers may actually gain an edge in their negotiations.

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December 2014

December 2014

- Negotiate for your career satisfaction. When interviewing for a new job, negotiators commonly make the following mistakes: (1) mispredicting what they will truly value in life; (2) holding themselves back; and (3) failing to recognize their relative bargaining position. Advice from experts at the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School will help you overcome these pitfalls and negotiate for your long-term fulfillment and success.
- How to avoid bidding wars. In its negotiations for a new footwear endorsement deal with NBA star Kevin Durant, Nike faced a question that haunts buyers in competitive markets: Should you compete for a scarce commodity and risk overpaying in a bidding war or stay out of the race and risk being left behind? In fact, buyers are rarely limited to such either-or choices. Five other options might help you gain an edge.
- Dear Negotiation Coach: Dealing with your children. Parents often find themselves relying on hardball tactics like threats and bribes when dealing with their young children. Our Negotiation Coach for this issue, Negotiation Briefings editor Katherine Shonk, suggests several strategies from the business world that can help parents deal with their most challenging negotiating partners—their kids.

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November 2014

November 2014

- Decide when to go it alone. In Silicon Valley, the number of high-tech companies that negotiated acquisitions without significant help from an investment bank has skyrocketed in recent years. As we explain, the trend suggests both the pros and cons of negotiating in a complex environment without an agent.
- Introverts: Make the most of your personal style. Because negotiation is a social task, we might assume that extroverts would perform better than introverts on key bargaining tasks such as building rapport and influencing the other party. In fact, both introverts and extroverts have clear opportunities to build on their personal strengths and learn from one another.
- Dear Negotiation Coach: Switch from “should” to “could.” When encountering difficult ethical challenges in negotiation, we generally ask ourselves the question “What should I do?” Our Negotiation Coach for this issue, Harvard Law School professor Francesca Gino, shows how a simple rewording of this question can lead us to more creative solutions.

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October 2014

October 2014

- Be a better agent. In negotiation, sometimes we operate solo, advocating exclusively on our own behalf. But more often we negotiate on behalf of others—our organization, our boss, our family. We suggest what business negotiators can learn from Vice President Joe Biden’s approach to these challenges.

- Negotiate amid chaos. On April 29, the National Basketball Association (NBA) banned Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling from the league for life and fined him in reaction to racist remarks he made during a phone call. The NBA’s announcement set off a dizzying series of negotiations and legal battles that illustrate the challenges of dealing with an erratic partner.

- Dear Negotiation Coach: Respond to hard-bargaining tactics. When a counterpart is pressuring you to make a deal fast, how should you respond? Our Negotiation Coach for this issue, Harvard Kennedy School research fellow Eugene B. Kogan, explains how negotiators can turn the tables by threatening the loss of your attractive deal.

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September 2014

September 2014

What Aren’t You Noticing in Your Negotiations? A new book explains why we miss key information – and how we can do better.

Dealing With Negotiation Power Plays: The Amazon-Hachette dispute suggests ways to overcome hardball tactics.

Negotiating With the Enemy: The United States-Taliban prisoner swap.

Dear Negotiation Coach: A Change of Control.

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August 2014

August 2014

When Leading Multiparty Negotiations, Break It Down: A great negotiator offers lessons for simplifying complex talks.

In Business Negotiations, Prepare to “Consciously Uncouple”: Plan in advance what will happen if your partnership fails.

When Facing an Ideological Impasse, Appeal to Status: New research identifies a technique for breaking down barriers to agreement.

Negotiation Research You Can Use: Anger, sadness, and sacred issues.

Dear Negotiation Coach: The benefits of trust in negotiation and just how trusting you should be.

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July 2014

July 2014

How to Win at Win-Win Negotiation: Think you have to choose between collaborating and competing? A new book shows how you can have the best of both worlds.

Build Strong Relationships in Business Negotiations: When creating and implementing deals, negotiators reap great benefits from close bonds.

For Silicon Valley, a Breach of “Don’t Be Evil?” Allegations of collusion reflect the ethical perils of business negotiations.

Negotiation Research You Can Use: When Anchoring Isn’t Effective

Dear Negotiation Coach: Negotiating Patent Disputes in a Fair and Cost-Effective Manner.

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June 2014

June 2014

Launch More Productive Cross-Cultural Negotiations: Concerns about dignity, face-saving, and honor can derail negotiations conducted between cultures. Prepare to avoid misunderstandings and identify shared concerns.

Is Your Negotiating Style Holding You Back? A balance between assertiveness and empathy will improve your results.

How Will You Deal With Conflict? Rather than both empathizing and asserting, people often respond to any conflict that arises in negotiation in one of three suboptimal ways, write Mnookin, Peppet, and Tulumello in their book Beyond Winning.

Book Notes: Thanks For the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well – Make the most of feedback in your negotiations.

To Discourage Deception – Try These 12 Moves

Dear Negotiation Coach: Close to the Finish Line? Take a Step Back.

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May 2014

May 2014

Beyond Walking Away: Facing Difficult Negotiation Tactics Head-On: Coping with Lies, Threats, and Insults? Here’s How to Change the Game.

Get Past “Us” versus “Them”: A New Book Applies an Old Philosophy to Resolving Moral Conflicts.

Facebook’s Purchase of WhatsApp: Behind the Eye-Popping Acquisition.

Dear Negotiation Coach: Cooling Off After Conflict.

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April 2014

April 2014

Manage the Tension Between Claiming and Creating Value: Balance the Costs and Benefits of Sharing Information in Business Negotiations

In Negotiation, Emotional Intelligence Brings Mixed Results: The Ability to Regulate and Read Emotions May Be Less of a Boon to a Negotiator Than You May Expect.

Bringing Congress Back to the Negotiating Table: Political Science Offers a New Perspective on Washington Gridlock

Dear Negotiation Coach: The Benefits of Nonverbal Communication in Negotiation.

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