Event Date: Wednesday October 22, 2003
Time: DRF: 8:30-10:00am (Continental Breakfast at 8:00) Peervision Case Conference: 10:15-11:30am
Location: Pound 335, Harvard Law School

Presenter:
Linda Babcock
Sara Laschever

Professor Babcock and Ms. Laschever will discuss issues raised in their book Women Don’t Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide. The book examines a series of gender psychology and economic studies that illustrate the barriers holding women back from negotiation in the workplace and offers solutions on how women can ask for what they want in a manner that feels comfortable and possible. Drawing on research in psychology, sociology, economics and organizational behavior, Women Don’t Ask identifies the differences in how men and women negotiate for what they want.

Linda C. Babcock is a Professor of Economics and director of the Ph.D. program at Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management. Her research explores the causes of impasses in negotiations and the way negotiators process information.

Sara Laschever has worked as a writer and editor for almost 25 years and her work has been published by The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, The Village Voice, Vogue, The Boston Globe, The Boston Phoenix, and many other publications.

Following Professor Babcock and Ms. Laschever’s talk is a Peervision case. Stephen Linsky will present a case determining the most appropriate dispute resolution process for a dispute involving elderly parties. Emily Saltz will join him for the case and discussion.

Stephen M. Linsky is a founding member of The New Law Center, the first Boston-area collaborative law firm, and serves as co-chair of the Boston Bar Association ADR. He has served as a mediator, arbitrator, and facilitator in hundreds of cases.

Emily B. Saltz, MSW, is the founder and director of Elder Resources, a private practice providing a full range of geriatric care management services for elderly clients and their families. She has lectured and written extensively on issues including guardianship, caring for aging parents, and ethical issues in aging.

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