Event Date: Tuesday March 4, 2014
Time: 6:00 - 7:30 PM
Location: Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA

Join us as Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project discuss their latest book, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well. This event is hosted by the Harvard Book Store.

 

 

Tuesday, March 4th
6:00 – 7:30 PM
Brattle Theatre
40 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA
Entry is $5 – buy your tickets here.

 

We swim in an ocean of feedback. Bosses, colleagues, customers—but also family, friends, and in-laws—they all have “suggestions” for our performance, parenting, or appearance. We know that feedback is essential for healthy relationships and professional development—but we dread it and often dismiss it.

That’s because receiving feedback sits at the junction of two conflicting human desires. We do want to learn and grow. And we also want to be accepted just as we are right now. Thanks for the Feedback is the first book to address this tension head on. It explains why getting feedback is so crucial yet so challenging, and offers a powerful framework to help us take on life’s blizzard of off-hand comments, annual evaluations, and unsolicited advice with curiosity and grace.

The business world spends billions of dollars and millions of hours each year teaching people how to give feedback more effectively. Stone and Heen argue that we’ve got it backwards and show us why the smart money is on educating receivers— in the workplace and in personal relationships as well.

Coauthors of the international bestseller Difficult Conversations, Stone and Heen have spent the last ten years working with businesses, nonprofits, governments, and families to determine what helps us learn and what gets in our way. With humor and clarity, they blend the latest insights from neuroscience and psychology with practical, hard-headed advice.

 

About the authors:

Sheila Heen is a Partner at Triad Consulting Group and a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School. She also teaches courses for executives and lawyers through Harvard’s Executive Education series. Through her consulting practice Sheila has worked with a wide variety of clients. In addition to corporate clients like Ford, Citigroup, IBM, Shell, DuPont and Merck she has also provided training for the Singapore Supreme Court, assisted Greek and Turkish Cypriots grappling with the conflict that divides their island, and worked with Requestors who talk to families about donating a loved one’s organs for the New England Organ Bank. Recently she spent time in Barrow, Alaska, with the Inupiat Board of Directors for the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, who control the Arctic Slope and ANWR. Sheila spent ten years with the Harvard Negotiation Project, developing negotiation theory and practice. She specializes in particularly difficult negotiations – where emotions run high and relationships become strained. Sheila is co-author, along with Douglas Stone and Bruce Patton, of the New York Times Business Bestseller, Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (Penguin 2000).

Doug Stone is a Managing Partner at Triad Consulting Group and a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, where he teaches negotiation. Through Triad, he consults to a wide range of organizations, including Fidelity, Honda, HP, IBM, Merck, Microsoft, Shell, the Nature Conservancy, and the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center. He has also taught and mediated around the world. Stone is co-author, along with Bruce Patton and Sheila Heen, of Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (Penguin, 2000), a New York Times Business Bestseller. His articles on negotiation and conflict resolution have appeared in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, Management Consultant News, and IT Metrics, as well as in magazines like Parents and Real Simple. He has appeared on many TV and radio shows, including Oprah, and was a key-note speaker at the 2006 World Negotiation Forum in Brazil. From 1988 to 1998, in addition to his teaching and consulting, Stone was an Associate and then Associate Director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, where he worked with Roger Fisher and other colleagues on advanced negotiation applications and on the development of negotiation theory.

Comments

Comments are closed.