Event Date: Tuesday December 4, 2018
Time: 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Location: Hauser Hall Room 102, Harvard Law School Campus

The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School
is pleased to present 

25 Years After Oslo: Why is Palestinian Support for the Two-State Solution the Lowest Since 1993?

A talk with

Dr. Khalil Shikaki

Goldman Senior Fellow at the Crown Center, Brandeis University and
Director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research (PCPSR) in Ramallah

Moderated by

James Sebenius

Gordon Donaldson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School

 

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
6:30-8:00 p.m.
Hauser 102
Harvard Law School Campus
Cambridge, MA

Free and open to the public; refreshments will be provided.

About the Talk:

Khalil Shikaki will explore the shifts in public opinion regarding peace and the two-state solution since the signing of the Oslo agreement and likely future directions. He will focus on the hardening of attitudes among Palestinians during the past decade, the impact of domestic politics on willingness to compromise and the impact of two years of the Trump Administration. Shikaki will also answer the question of whether the hardening of Palestinian attitudes is reversible and at what cost.

About the speakers:

Khalil Shikaki is a Professor of Political Science and director of the Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research (Ramallah, Palestine). Since 2005 he has been a senior fellow at the Crown Center for Middle East Studies at Brandeis University. He finished his Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University in 1985, and taught at several Palestinian and American universities. Between 1996-99, Dr. Shikaki served as Dean of Scientific Research at al Najah University in Nablus. He spent summer 2002 as a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Since 1993, Dr. Shikaki has conducted more than 200 polls among Palestinians in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and, since 2000, dozens of joint polls among Palestinians and Israelis.

Between 1998-99, jointly with Dr. Yezid Sayigh, Dr. Shikaki led a group of more than 25 Palestinian and foreign experts on Palestinian institution building. The findings of the group were published in a Council on Foreign Relations’ report, Strengthening Palestinian Public Institutions (New York: Council on Foreign Relations, 1999). Shikaki and Sayigh were the principal authors of the report.

Dr. Shikaki’s research has focused on the peace process, Palestinian state building, public opinion, transition to democracy, and the impact of domestic Palestinian politics on the peace process. He is the co-author of the annual report of the Arab Democracy Index and a member of the Steering Committee of the Arab Barometer, two initiatives led by the Arab Reform Initiative.

James Sebenius is the Gordon Donaldson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, and Vice-Chair for Practice-Focused Research for the Program on Negotiation Executive Committee. He is director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, chair of the Great Negotiator Award Committee and co-director of the American Secretaries of State Program. An authority on complex negotiations, he has advanced the field in the academic realm, in the public and diplomatic sectors, and the business world; outside Harvard, he has worked full-time in the U.S. Commerce and State Departments as well as at the Blackstone Group. At the Harvard Business School, Sebenius spearheaded the effort to make negotiation a required course in the M.B.A. program, and he created the negotiation department, which he led for several years. As a co-founder of Lax Sebenius LLC, he provides negotiation advisory services to corporations and governments worldwide.

Comments

Leave a Reply