Negotiation research you can use: To discourage deception, try these 12 moves

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In negotiation, deception can run rampant: parties “stretch” the numbers, conceal key information, and make promises they know they can’t keep.

Unfortunately, most of us are very poor lie detectors. Even professionals who encounter liars regularly, such as police officers and judges, perform not much better than chance at detecting deception, Professor Paul Ekman of the

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