Negotiation Advice from Negotiation Briefings: The Best of “Dear Negotiation Coach”

Claim your free copy from the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

Dear Business Professional,

Michael’s story says a lot about the need for effective negotiation. Here’s how he tells it:

“I was recently promoted into a role that requires me to do a considerable amount of negotiating, something that I have little experience in doing. I keep running into situations—whether I’m negotiating a vendor’s contract or a new hire’s salary, or purchasing a big-ticket item—that makes me wish I had an expert to help guide my decisions at the bargaining table.

That’s where the Negotiation Advice from Negotiation Briefings: The Best of “Dear Negotiation Coach” comes in. Nearly every day, I scour the Internet for ideas and tips that will help me be more effective at work. So, when I searched for “negotiating advice,” imagine my surprise to come across Negotiation Advice from Negotiation Briefings: The Best of “Dear Negotiation Coach”, a free report from the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

This free report features the “best of” advice from some of the top negotiators in the world. Their answers to often-encountered negotiation issues have proven to be invaluable in my new role. Negotiation Advice from Negotiation Briefings: The Best of “Dear Negotiation Coach” offers best practices on a variety of negotiation and conflict resolution topics—from how to quell nerves, to drawing information out of counterparts, to dealing with hard bargainers—that fall into four categories:

1. The Big Picture

This section of the report taught me about the importance of looking at the broad challenges I’m facing before focusing on the nitty gritty details. It offers expert advice on managing a negotiating team effectively, negotiating responsibly, negotiating across cultures, and negotiating with our critics. By reading this section, I learned to:

  • Address the social consequences of a deal before closing the deal
  • Capitalize on different preferences, priorities, beliefs, and values
  • Get the right people to the table
  • Engage in informal problem solving and anticipate future disputes

2. Preparing to Negotiate

The best bargainers do a lot of the hard work before sitting down at the bargaining table—from analyzing mindsets and personalities to identifying potential blind spots. The advice in this section helped me:

  • Reframe anxiety as excitement
  • Focus on opportunities
  • Adapt my personality to the situation
  • Invite clarification and ask for patience
  • Connect, build trust, move forward

3. Mastering at-the-Table Tactics

Creating value. Encouraging honesty. Drawing information out of the other party. This section of the report taught me techniques for accomplishing all three of these things. It also provided advice on the all-important question of when to “kick it upstairs.” I gained tips for:

  • Making my counterpart feel more relaxed
  • Asking the right questions to prevent being lied to
  • Encouraging honesty
  • Being a good, and careful, listener
  • Bringing my boss in at the right time (after exhausting all other options)

4. When the Going Gets Tough

Learning concrete ways to deal with challenging people and tactics is a skill that every manager needs to master. This section of the report prepared me to cope with conflict at work, including how to:

  • Tame hard bargainers
  • Deal with a problem partner
  • Intervene in workplace conflict
  • Engage in joint problem solving
  • Promote effective feedback

Needless to say, Negotiation Advice from Negotiation Briefings: The Best of “Dear Negotiation Coach” has been an amazing resource for me as I grow into my new role. In its pages, I gained actionable advice that I can incorporate into my everyday life.

Become a Master Negotiator with this Free Special Report
For the past ten years, the back page of Negotiation Briefings has featured advice from Program on Negotiation authorities—esteemed negotiation experts who have answered readers’ questions about important negotiation and conflict resolutions. This timely report compiles 16 of these popular columns, all in an easy-to-read format.

Download your free report today
Download your complimentary copy of Negotiation Advice from Negotiation Briefings: The Best of “Dear Negotiation Coach, right now. To do so, simply click the button below.

We know you’ll be glad you did.

Sincerely,
Gail Odeneal
Director of Marketing
Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School

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