Daniel Shapiro

Dan Shapiro

Founder and Director, Harvard International Negotiation Program

Associate Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital

Affiliate faculty, Program on Negotiation

The founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program, Daniel Shapiro teaches a highly evaluated course on negotiation at Harvard College; instructs psychology interns at Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital; and leads executive education sessions at the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital. He also has served on the faculty at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, and at the Sloan School of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Named one of the top 15 professors at Harvard University, Shapiro specializes in practice-based research—building theory and testing it in real-world contexts. He has launched successful conflict resolution initiatives in the Middle East, Europe, and East Asia, and for three years chaired the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Conflict Resolution. Focusing extensively on the emotional and identity-based dimensions of negotiation and conflict resolution, Shapiro led the initiative to create the world’s first Global Curriculum on Conflict Management for senior policymakers as well as a conflict management curriculum that now reaches one million youth across more than 20 countries. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the American Psychological Association’s Early Career Award and the Cloke-Millen Peacemaker of the Year Award.

Education

B.A., Johns Hopkins University

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst

Research interests

Conflict resolution, negotiation, meditation, the role of emotions in negotiation

Selected publications

Comments

6 Responses to “Daniel Shapiro”

  • Katie B.

    I practice collaborative divorce in Texas. Education is a key component. Confronting conflict head-on — as a substantive issue — is just one of my soapboxes. I understand these issues from the inside out as the mother of a 12-year old now in a therapeutic boarding school in Idaho and as a divorced person of someone who exhibits narcissistic behaviors. So, thank you for what you are doing to help us all, from international politics to nuclear families.

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  • Fawaz A.

    I recently had the honour of meeting Professor Shapiro in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Where he was conducting an executive course on negotiation. Professor Shapiro truly is a scholar of negotiation, and has an amazing way of transferring his knowledge and passion about negotiation to his students. His methods approach negotiations as an art and teaches that the art of negotiation is not only relevant in business and diplomacy environments, but also on the personal level and Our most intimate relationships.

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  • Pon U.

    Dan, aside from being just a lovely person was the most exceptional lecturer when I took a 3 day course at Harvard. His cases were fantastic and he really pushes you to think critically and ethically.

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  • Silvana K.

    Hi Daniel – we met centuries ago in Vancouver.. at the YGL Summit in Vancouver.. I’d love to invite you to Iceland, where we have an amazing gathering of women Presidents and Prime Ministers, and a discussion on “Power, together”, and how to get to peace. How to best reach you? If you can’t come yourself, an idea who would be (almost) as great of a contributor as you would be appreciated!
    All the best
    Silvana Koch-Mehrin

    Reply
  • alex g.

    Dr. Shapiro, by far the best Big Think presentation about how negotiations work. Insightful and helpful. Thank you for deciphering the almost impenetrable human self-preservation mode.

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  • john b.

    Dr. Shapiro, My successes had convinced me I knew what I was doing in problem and conflict resolution with all my students; individual, corporate, and institutional clients; and personal relationships, until I booked a stunning failure. Whether I am learning and applying the lessons from Negotiating the Nonnegotiable or not has yet to be seen, but the book is a mind-changer. Congratulations and thank you!

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