Announcing the 2012-2013 PON Graduate Research Fellows

By on / Daily, Graduate Research Fellowships, PON Graduate Research Fellowships, Students

The Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellowships are designed to encourage young scholars from the social sciences and professional disciplines to pursue theoretical, empirical, and/or applied research in negotiation and dispute resolution. Consistent with the PON goal of fostering the development of the next generation of scholars, this program provides support for one year of dissertation research and writing in negotiation and related topics in alternative dispute resolution, as well as giving fellows an opportunity to immerse themselves in the diverse array of resources available at PON.

We are very excited to have three new fellows join us this fall:

Alexander E. Kentikelenis
PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge

Alexander is a PhD student in sociology at the University of Cambridge and a member of King’s College. His research is in the fields of political economy and public health. Using mixed research methods, his work focuses on the effects of financial crises and International Monetary Fund programs on social policies. During his time at PON, Alexander will study negotiations over loan conditions in agreements between the IMF and borrowing countries. He has published in the Lancet and the European Journal of Public Health, and his work has been featured in various media outlets, including the New York Times, Reuters and the BBC. Alexander also holds an MPhil in Development Studies from Cambridge.

 

Corinne Low
PhD Candidate, Economics at Columbia University

Corinne is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at Columbia University. Her research in Zambia, Kenya, and the United States focuses on the determinants of intra-household allocations, including matching, bargaining, and negotiation. Her current work uses a randomized-controlled trial to explore the role negotiation training can play in increasing Zambian girls’ access to schooling and household resources. The project also aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of negotiation, and thus its potential applications. If negotiation creates the illusion of joint gains while really serving to redistribute toward the trained negotiator, the social benefits of negotiation are likely to be minimal. On the other hand, if negotiation actually allows agents to overcome inefficiencies, then there are broad social gains to expanding negotiation training beyond its current reaches. Corinne is a 2008 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, and has a B.S. in Economics from Duke University. Prior to joining Columbia, she worked as a management consultant for McKinsey and Company, serving Fortune 500 companies and government clients.

 

Alexandra van Geen
Ph.D. Candidate, Public Policy, Harvard University

Alexandra is a Ph.D candidate in Public Policy at Harvard University. She is an experimental economist and her research focuses on behavioral economics, reducing (gender) inequality and risk attitudes. Specifically she is interested to design interventions that improve judgment and decision-making.

As a PON Graduate research fellow she will conduct a randomized experiment at a large firm to test an intervention aimed to help overcome gender biases and discrimination in promotion negotiations. This new mechanism, an information nudge, changes the context used to evaluate candidates. She has tested a similar mechanism in the lab where it has proven very successful.

Alexandra holds an MPhil in economics from the CentEr institute at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and a BA from University College Utrecht at Utrecht University. She has worked for the Dutch Parliament and served as a consultant.

Click Here for additional Information about our Graduate Research Fellowships.

Alexandra van Geen

Ph.D. Candidate, Public Policy, Harvard University

Alexandra is a Ph.D candidate in Public Policy at Harvard University. She is an experimental economist and her research focuses on behavioral economics, reducing (gender) inequality and risk attitudes. Specifically she is interested to design interventions that improve judgment and decision-making.

As a PON Graduate research fellow she will conduct a randomized experiment at a large firm to test an intervention aimed to help overcome gender biases and discrimination in promotion negotiations. This new mechanism, an information nudge, changes the context used to evaluate candidates. She has tested a similar mechanism in the lab where it has proven very successful.

Alexandra holds an MPhil in economics from the CentEr institute at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and a BA from University College Utrecht at Utrecht University. She has worked for the Dutch Parliament and served as a consultant.

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