Graduate Research Fellows

2022-2023 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Elizabeth Good
Ph.D. Candidate, Northwestern University Department of Political Science

Elizabeth Good is a Ph.D. Candidate and SSHRC Doctoral Fellow at Northwestern University. Her dissertation uses mixed methodology to explore women’s representation in peace processes. Elizabeth studies the influence of gendered power dynamics on women’s involvement in peace negotiations and the inclusion of provisions for women in final agreements. Elizabeth holds an M.A. in Political Science and a B.A. in International Relations and Geography from the University of British Columbia. She has worked for various Non-Governmental and International Organizations, including the United Nations Development Programme in Kosovo as a Gender Specialist.

Alexandra McAuliff
Ph.D. Candidate, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University

Alexandra McAuliff is a doctoral candidate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where her work focuses on gender, negotiations, and peacebuilding. Her dissertation is titled The Troubles with Inclusion: Northern Ireland and Gendered Hierarchies of Peace. She is particularly interested in the limits of women’s inclusion in negotiations absent attention to the power hierarchies that inform these processes. In her dissertation work, she questions the foundational assumptions of negotiations, with specific attention to the ways militarized and masculinized power shapes the people and issues deemed conflict-related. To do so, McAuliff examines the process and legacy of the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland and the ways gendered, racialized, and classed violence and insecurity continue to be experienced by those at the margins, despite twenty years of a political peace. In addition to her dissertation research, McAuliff is also part of a cross-university research team working on questions related to migration and diplomacy. At Fletcher, McAuliff serves as a Teaching Fellow and runs the Non-Violent Resistance Fellowship. Prior to pursuing her doctoral degree, she worked as a dialogue facilitator with a small peacebuilding group in Northern Ireland, as well as at Seeds of Peace, a youth-focused leadership organization. McAuliff holds a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School, and a Bachelor of Arts from Colby College. While pursuing her master’s degree, she worked with the Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice’s Women PeaceMakers Program.

Katri Nousiainen
Ph.D. Candidate in Commercial Law, Hanken School of Economics

As a PON Fellow, Nousiainen is conducting empirical research on the impact of legal design and ethics in commercial contracts using the lens of law and economics. She is interested in employing technology within law, economics, and legal design. Her prospective work intends to scientifically measure the total impact of legal design, and to find, for example, metrics to assess efficiency and quality in legal products, services, and processes.

Nousiainen gives expert legal lectures on various practice areas of commercial law, legal design and law & technology. She is an invited keynote speaker at conferences and seminars across the US, Europe and LATAM. In addition to her work at the Program on Negotiation, she is also conducting her research at the University of Cambridge Law (the UK). She holds a European Master in Law and Economics (EMLE) LL.M (Erasmus University Rotterdam), a Master Universitario di primo livello (University of Bologna), a Master d’Analyse Economique du Droit et des Institutions (Université Paul Cézanne Aix-Marseille III), and a BA in Law (International University Audentes, TUT, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven).

Helen Winter
Ph.D. Candidate, European University Viadrina
Term of fellowship 2021-2023

Helen Winter is a mediator and founder of the charitable organization R3SOLUTE based in Berlin. R3SOLUTE empowers refugees and locals to manage and prevent conflicts in their communities through dialogue work and peer mediation.

Winter holds a law degree with a focus on International Public Law from Heidelberg University, and an LL.M. with a specialization in Dispute Resolution from Pepperdine University’s Straus Institute. She is pursuing a Ph.D. at European University Viadrina. Her dissertation examines how a peer-mediation training and clinic for refugees could be designed such that peer-mediation mechanisms can be established among refugee populations living in refugee shelters.

In her own mediation practice, Winter mostly deals with intercultural disputes. Previously, Winter has worked as a mediator with the L.A. Superior Court and as a consultant with On Deck Mediation, where her expertise included anti-discrimination and labor law. Additionally, she has worked with the United Nations Office of the Ombudsman and Mediation Services (UNOMS), where systemic issues within the United Nations is addressed.

 

2021-2022 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Jungwoo Chun
Ph.D. Candidate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Urban Studies and Planning
Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cybersecurity Clinic

Jungwoo Chun, Ph.D. Candidate in the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning and Director of the MIT Cybersecurity Clinic, studies the role of intermediaries in mobilizing public interest technologies – focusing on energy, transport, and IT. His dissertation centers around conflict management in renewable energy development, more specifically, the various roles that intermediaries of different kinds can play in resolving “siting disputes”. He is a graduate instructor for a variety of courses on negotiation, environmental policy & planning, and water diplomacy. He is a lecturer and an organizing committee member of the BLOXHUB Summer School on Urban Resilience. Before joining MIT, he worked for various international organizations, designing governance frameworks and negotiating with multiple stakeholders on topics related to international waters and energy resources. He holds an M.A. in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School at Tufts University and a B.A. and M.A. in International Studies from Korea University.

Tim McDonald
Ph.D. Candidate, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Assistant Policy Researcher, RAND Corporation

Tim McDonald is a Graduate Fellow at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, and an Assistant Policy Researcher at the RAND Corporation. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Policy Design. His dissertation focuses on developing methods for leadership and design of large and complex systems, and the application of such methods to redesigning socially important systems such as health, education, the economy, and national defense. As a PON fellow, he will investigate the relationships among negotiation, strategy, and system transformation in the context of deep uncertainty. Specifically, he will study how to develop robust and adaptive agreements that satisfy demands of the near-term while incrementally redesigning the broader environment to alter its evolution. His research is forthcoming in the American Journal of Health Economics, American Journal of Managed Care, and Journal of Policy and Complex Systems; and has been published in several RAND research reports. He is the author of Unsustainable: A Strategy for Making Public Schooling More Productive, Effective, and Affordable, a book on education system reform published by Rowman & Littlefield. He holds an M.P.P. in business and government from the Harvard Kennedy School, and a B.A. in political science from Hamline University.

Nicolás Parra-Herrera
S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School

Nicolás Parra-Herrera is an S.J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School. His research focuses on alternative dispute resolution (ADR), pragmatism, and legal theory. His dissertation is an intellectual history of ADR (including negotiation studies) in the twentieth century. Specifically, he is tracing the institutional, ethical, and communitarian strands in the ADR discourse and its pragmatic heritage from Pound’s First Address to online dispute resolution. Nicolás holds an LL.M. from Harvard Law School (degree waived), an M.A. and a B.A. in Philosophy and an LL.B. from Universidad de los Andes, Colombia. He has been a professor of negotiation, mediation, dispute system design, legal theory and other courses at Universidad de los Andes, a member of the Harvard Mediation Program, a Teaching Fellow in leadership courses at Harvard Kennedy School, a Graduate Program Fellow at Harvard Law School, a clerk at the Colombian Constitutional Court, and an associate at prestigious law firms in Colombia. As a PON Fellow, Nicolás will continue his dissertation research focusing on how the genealogy of ADR shapes individuals, communities, and institutions by understanding the philosophical, economic, and political agendas that promote ADR and the meaning of the turn to ODR for this intellectual project.

Helen Winter
European University Viadrina

Helen Winter is a mediator and founder of the charitable organization R3SOLUTE based in Berlin. R3SOLUTE empowers refugees and locals to manage and prevent conflicts in their communities through dialogue work and peer mediation.

Winter holds a law degree with a focus on International Public Law from Heidelberg University, and an LL.M. with a specialization in Dispute Resolution from Pepperdine University’s Straus Institute. She is pursuing a Ph.D. at European University Viadrina. Her dissertation examines how a peer-mediation training and clinic for refugees could be designed such that peer-mediation mechanisms can be established among refugee populations living in refugee shelters.

In her own mediation practice, Winter mostly deals with intercultural disputes. Previously, Winter has worked as a mediator with the L.A. Superior Court and as a consultant with On Deck Mediation, where her expertise included anti-discrimination and labor law. Additionally, she has worked with the United Nations Office of the Ombudsman and Mediation Services (UNOMS), where systemic issues within the United Nations is addressed.

 

2020-2021 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Brenda Dvoskin
SJD Candidate, Harvard Law School

Brenda Dvoskin researches how social media companies engage third parties in drafting and updating their content moderation rules. As a PON fellow, she will continue working on her doctoral dissertation with a special focus on how academia and civil society participate in this rulemaking process.

Dvoskin was a Berkman Klein Center fellow (2019-2020) and a Teaching Fellow for Social Media and the Law at Harvard Law School. Before starting her doctoral research, she worked as a legal advisor for the Solicitor General of Argentina. She holds an LLM degree from HLS (Fulbright scholar) and a Bachelor of Laws from Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.

Benjamin Naimark-Rowse
Ph.D. Candidate and Topol Fellow in Nonviolent Resistance, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

Benjamin Naimark-Rowse is a Ph.D. candidate and the Topol Fellow in Nonviolent Resistance at The Fletcher School where he teaches, researches and writes about social movements. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at SciencesPo. He is a Term Member in the Council on Foreign Relations, a Truman National Security Fellow, and the Founding Director of the Seevak Human Rights and Social Justice Fellowship. He has served as a Program Officer with the Open Society Justice Initiative, an electoral observer with The Carter Center, a Multilateral Affairs Researcher with the Open Society Policy Center, and as a board member of the University of Chicago’s Human Rights Program. From 2007-2010, he co-directed Darfurian Voices, the first public opinion survey of Darfurian refugees on issues of peace, justice, and reconciliation. Benjamin holds a M.P.A. from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School and a B.A. with honors from the University of Chicago. His publications include, “Surviving Success: Nonviolent Rebellion in Sudan,” “Nonviolent Resistance,” and “The Founding Myth of the United States of America.” His teaching includes From Gandhi to the Arab Spring: Theory and Practice of Nonviolent Resistance. His ongoing research projects include, “Liberating the ‘Enemy’ in South Africa’s Anti-Apartheid Struggle” and “Dollars and Dissent: Foundation Support for Social Movement Building.” He is the father of twin girls.

 

2019-2020 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Aria Ritz Finkelstein
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT

Aria Ritz Finkelstein is a Ph.D. Candidate at MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning and a Guest Student in Marine Policy at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Her dissertation focuses on the negotiations leading towards an international legally binding instrument governing the uses of biodiversity on the high seas. As a PON fellow, she will draw from negotiations theory to understand how the ambiguity of terms like “biodiversity” either facilitate or inhibit agreement throughout international mapping workshops and meetings.
Aria holds an M.S. in Urban Design and an M.Arch. from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a B.A. in English from the University of Georgia. At MIT, she has been a course instructor and a teaching assistant for undergraduate and graduate courses in planning and design, and she has researched the politics of landscape planning in both arid and marine environments. Before returning to academia, she worked as an urban designer, facilitating planning processes and developing plans for communities around Georgia.

Rob Grace
Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science, Brown University

Rob Grace is a PhD student in Political Science at Brown University. His research focuses on the politics of humanitarian action, with a particular emphasis on humanitarian access obstruction. His dissertation examines how and why international humanitarian actors sometimes succeed, and sometimes fall short, in their efforts to effectively negotiate humanitarian access during armed conflicts. He is a Senior Associate at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI), where he has contributed to humanitarian negotiation workshops convened with humanitarian practitioners across the globe. Previously at HHI, he served as the lead researcher on a project focused on the practices of monitoring, reporting, and fact-finding missions mandated to examine alleged violations of international humanitarian law and human rights. The project culminated with the publication by Cambridge University Press of the HPCR Practitioner’s Handbook on Monitoring, Reporting, and Fact-Finding. He is also a researcher and affiliated fellow at the Humanitarian Innovation Initiative, based at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs. In this role, he is leading a research effort that examines contemporary challenges of civil-military coordination in humanitarian response. He co-teaches a graduate course on the politics of international emergency response at The Heller School for Social Policy and Management,
Brandeis University. His writing has been published by the Journal of Conflict & Security Law, World Health & Population, the European Society of International Law, Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Protection, the Foreign Policy Association, and Foreign Policy in Focus. He holds an MA in Politics from New York University and a BA from Vassar College.

Fady Khoury
S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School

Fady Khoury is an S.J.D candidate at Harvard Law School. His research interests include Comparative Constitutional Law, Human Rights, and the intersection between Law, Society and Politics. Fady’s dissertation explores constitutional law and design in deeply divided societies.
As a PON fellow, Fady will continue his dissertation research examining the potential utilization of constitutional law, power-sharing strategies and federal arrangements as conflict resolution and peace-building tools in deeply divided societies, with a special focus on Belgium, Lebanon, Northern Ireland and Palestine-Israel, exploring, both descriptively and normatively, the design and functions of the judicial branch within power-sharing political systems.
Fady holds a Bachelor of Laws from Haifa University. Before Harvard Law School, Fady worked as a civil rights attorney at Adalah – the Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel.

Samantha Lakin
Ph.D. Candidate, Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University

Samantha Lakin, M.A., is an advanced doctoral candidate at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Her dissertation is titled, “Kwibuka: Divergent Memory and the Quest for Justice in Post-Genocide Rwanda.” Lakin’s research aims to contribute to the study of symbolic and holistic transitional justice, beyond punishing perpetrators, and is ultimately a commentary about human resilience in the face of atrocities. Lakin worked to found the Department of Research, Policy, and Higher Education at Aegis Trust and the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Rwanda, as a community consultant for the Ambassador’s Fund for Cultural Preservation with the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda, as a Team Lead on action-based research about gender and corruption in Lubumbashi, DRC, and on research contracts in Northern Uganda, Ethiopia, and Nigeria. She held two Fulbright Scholarships, one in Rwanda in 2017-2018, and another in Switzerland in 2011-2012. Lakin served as a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Research and Dialogue for Peace (IRDP) in Kigali in 2018. Lakin is an active public intellectual, having authored over 20 academic journal articles and op-eds, and speaking at universities, in communities, and for programs like TedXFulbright and Talks@Google. Lakin holds a Master of Arts in International Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School at Tufts University, and a B.A., Magna Cum Laude, from Brandeis University.

 

2018-2019 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Talia Gillis
Ph.D. Candidate, Business Economics, Harvard Business School and Economics Department, Harvard University
S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School

Talia Gillis is a Ph.D. candidate in Business Economics, a joint program of Harvard Business School and the Economics Department at Harvard. She is also a S.J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School. Her research focuses on household financial decision-making and the regulation of consumer finance. She has written on the ways in which financial regulators perceive their roles and test disclosures prior to their adoption. Her empirical research focuses on mental accounting and how it relates to spending and saving behavior.

As a PON fellow she intends to extend her research to the regulation of financial markets through the enforcement of discrimination laws. In particular she is interested in how the use of big data and machine learning techniques to price credit reshapes the relationship between lenders and borrowers, and how the existing discrimination framework can be applied to this new context. Prior to beginning her Ph.D. and S.J.D., Talia completed the Bachelor Civil Law at Oxford University and holds a Bachelor of Laws in Law and Economics from the Hebrew University.

Gali Racbi
S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School

Gali Racbi is an S.J.D. student at Harvard Law School. His research interests are Labor and Employment Law, Labor Relations and Empirical Legal Studies (qualitative methods and social network analysis). Gali’s dissertation project studies how platform-workers (Uber drivers, for example) socialize, unionize, and negotiate for voice and improved working conditions across different localities in the U.S.

As a PON fellow, Gali will study how gig workers who are excluded from employee-status employment and labor regulations interact with the platform in the shade of local and federal institutions.

Gali holds a Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Arts in Law and Humanities from Haifa University. Before Harvard Law School, Gali Worked as an associate at Ben Ari, Fish, Saban & Co. and was a union organizer for the Israeli ‘Power to the Workers‘ labor union.

Benjamin J. Spatz
Ph.D. Candidate, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University

Benjamin J. Spatz is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. His research focuses on the politics of conflict and elite bargaining in neo-patrimonial political systems. He is the recipient of doctoral awards from the United States Institute of Peace, Eisenhower Institute, Topol Family Foundation, Tobin Project, and Tufts University.

As a PON Fellow, Ben will continue his dissertation research examining how international targeted sanctions interact with domestic logics of political control to alter the balance of political power in sanctioned polities, thereby impacting elite bargaining preferences, governance strategies and political outcomes.

Ben holds a Master of Science in Foreign Service degree from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and degrees in Philosophy and International Studies from the University of Washington. He is a Truman National Security Fellow and a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has conducted extensive in-depth research in West Africa and his professional experience includes, most recently, serving as a member of the United Nations Panel of Experts on Liberia.

Yasmin Zaerpoor
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Yasmin Zaerpoor is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Environmental Policy and Planning Group within the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her doctoral research is on how different stakeholder values, types of knowledge and capabilities affect transboundary cooperation in the Eastern Nile River Basin (i.e., between Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan). As a PON Graduate Research Fellow, Yasmin will draw from negotiation and dispute resolution tools, approaches and principles for her analysis of transboundary water governance.

Yasmin has been a Teaching Assistant in Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning and in Environmental Justice, two graduate courses at MIT. She has also co-instructed a graduate level Water Diplomacy course at MIT and co-managed the Water Diplomacy Workshop, a week-long train-the-trainer style workshop that teaches negotiation skills to water managers from around the world. She holds a Master of Science in Urban Planning from Columbia University and a Bachelor of Science in Animal Physiology and Neuroscience from the University of California – San Diego.

 

2017-2018 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Ashley Martin
Ph.D. Candidate, Management, Columbia Business School

Ashley Martin is a fifth year Ph.D. student in Management at Columbia Business School. Her research focuses on how organizational diversity strategies uniquely and differentially affect underrepresented groups. In her research, Ashley has found that best practices for approaching racial differences (i.e., awareness strategies), can backfire when applied to gender differences. In masculine leadership domains, she finds that focusing on the commonalities between men and women can lead to more empowerment from women, less bias from men, and more gender-egalitarian interactions. Her research has received grants and awards from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and from the W. Edwards Deming Center.

As a PON fellow she plans to extend her research to examine how diversity strategies affect individuals with multiple and intersectional social identities (e.g., women of color). She seeks to understand how their confidence and outcomes in negotiations are influenced by these strategies. Prior to beginning her Ph.D., Ashley completed her Bachelor of Commerce and Master of Science in Organizational Behavior at Queen’s University in Canada.

Mounia Mostefaoui
Ph.D. Candidate, Economics and Political Science, La Sorbonne University, France

Mounia Mostefaoui is currently a Ph.D. candidate at La Sorbonne University as part of her interdisciplinary project on international negotiations about climate change within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Her doctoral thesis focuses on the new role of science in those negotiations.

She completed her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at Ecole Polytechnique and HEC, France, focusing on Economics, Management and Climate Change. She also holds a Master’s degree in French Literature from La Sorbonne University. She has worked at MIT under the supervision of Professor Kerry Emanuel as a co-investigator on a project studying the effects of global warming and solar radiation management for tropical cyclones.

As a PON research fellow, Mounia will focus on the topic of getting compliance without enforcement in international treaties for climate change. She will study the related transparency mechanisms, especially considering the French and American cases. Empirical support for this perspective includes two case studies (the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement), as well as several interviews and participations to the international negotiations on climate change during the Conferences of Parties (COP) where she has directly been involved as a member of the French Delegation during COP22 in Marrakech.

Annkatrin Tritschoks
Ph.D. Candidate, Uppsala University, Sweden

Annkatrin Tritschoks is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University, Sweden. In her research, she focuses on justice in international negotiations in the context of improving negotiation effectiveness. In her composite dissertation, she aims to address questions around what factors shape justice behavior in international negotiations in order to identify conditions and circumstances that promote justice adherence that can in turn lead to more effective and durable negotiated outcomes.

As a PON Graduate Research Fellow, Annkatrin will investigate the role of the chair for justice adherence in international, multilateral negotiations. Combining the supply and demand side of leadership theory in negotiations, the project looks at both strategic choices of the chair and perceptions by the negotiating parties, in the context of justice adherence, negotiation management, and negotiation effectiveness. The project will draw on empirical data from case studies of multilateral environmental negotiations.

Annkatrin is a member of the Research School of Peace and Conflict, an academic consortium based in Oslo, Norway. She holds a Master of Social Science in Political Science and International Relations with a specialization in Peace and Conflict Research from Uppsala University and a Bachelor of Arts in European Studies from Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany. Before commencing her Ph.D. studies, Annkatrin worked at the Europe and Central Asia division of Human Rights Watch.

Aluma Zernik
S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School

Aluma Zernik is an S.J.D. Candidate at Harvard Law School. She is a Terence M. Considine Fellow in Law and Economics. Her research interests are Behavioral Economics, Consumer Contracts, Financial Regulation and Empirical Legal Studies. Aluma’s dissertation project investigates the impact of regulatory intervention and market forces on consumers’ financial management and decision making.

As a PON fellow, Aluma will research the tension between individuals’ present and future preferences, and how the design of financial products, decision-making settings and commitment mechanisms impact individuals’ ability to represent their own future-best-interest.

She holds a Bachelor of Laws/Bachelor of Arts in Law and Cognitive Sciences from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, is an editor for the Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, and Coordinates Harvard’s Empirical Legal Studies Group (HELS). Before joining Harvard Law School, Aluma worked as an Associate at Agmon & Co. and clerked for Asher Grunis, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Israel.

 

2016-2017 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Meirav Furth-Matzkin
S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School

Meirav Furth-Matzkin is a research fellow at the John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics & Business and the Program on the Foundations of Private Law at Harvard Law School. Her primary research interests are contract law, consumer contracts, negotiation, behavioral law and economics, and empirical methods in law. Her dissertation project investigates the impact of deceptive market practices on consumers’ (mis)perceptions and behavior, while applying mixed empirical methodologies and psychological insights. Her first paper on this topic, which was awarded the Harvard Law School’s Olin Prize for the best paper in Law & Economics, reveals that drafting parties routinely contravene the law by inserting unenforceable terms into their contracts. As a PON fellow, Meirav will research the role that such legally dubious clauses play in post-contract negotiations, through a series of experimental studies.

Meirav holds a Master of Laws from Harvard Law School and a Bachelor’s Degree in Law and International Relations magna cum laude from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is a Pearlman Scholar and a P.E.O International Peace Prize recipient. She is also a member of Harvard’s Empirical Legal Studies Group (HELS) and the Behavioral Insights Group (BIG) at Harvard Business School. Before joining Harvard Law School, Meirav clerked for Justice Uzi Vogelman at the Supreme Court of Israel.

Liliia Khasanova
Ph.D. Candidate, International Law, Kazan Federal University, Russia

Liliia Khasanova’s research focuses on the resolution of international trade disputes mainly within the framework of the World Trade Organization. Her research has an interdisciplinary nature and combines both theoretical and practical approaches. The theoretical approach of her research includes detailed legal analysis of the negotiation procedures and dispute settlement systems of the World Trade Organization, while the practical approach aims to define certain guidelines for negotiations in international trade disputes. The project objective is to prove that negotiations that lead to a ‘mutually-agreed solution’ are the most profitable, convenient, and flexible way to resolve trade disputes at any stage of the conflict.

Liliia received her Specialist Degree in Law summa cum laude from Kazan Federal University, and she prepared her graduate thesis at the University of Giessen, Germany. She has gained international academic experience through participation in International WTO Moot Court Competition, Moot Court on International Arbitration, and International Rounds of Phillip C. Jessup Competition. Her team ranked first in negotiations at the International Competition ‘Day of Crisis’ 2015 in Paris.

Taylor Moulton
Ph.D. Candidate, Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Taylor Moulton is a complex systems scholar whose work focuses on exploring productivity, emotion, and relationship dynamics between individuals and organizations. In his negotiation research, Taylor investigates the interactions between personalities, power, and objective performance. His research also includes exploring the micro-mechanisms building or eroding subjective value in negotiations and their influence on outcomes. In particular, he is interested in studying the importance of timing in negotiated agreements.

Taylor holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering from the University of Florida and a Master of Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before beginning his doctoral studies, he enjoyed a wide array of experiences in the fields of engineering, investment finance, and nonprofit environmental education.

Adepeju O. Solarin
Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science, Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Germany

Adepeju Solarin completed her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, focusing on Management and New Media Studies, and Restorative Justice and International Human Rights. She is currently a dual researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in the Research School on Retaliation, Mediation, and Punishment (REMEP), and the Arnold Bergstraesser Institute as part of her interdisciplinary project on international mediation. Her doctoral thesis focuses on the role of respect in international mediation.

As a PON research fellow, Adepeju will focus on differentiating respect from trust and demonstrate how and why mediation practices might benefit from an initial focus on respectful behavior when convening conflict antagonists. Empirical support for this perspective includes two case studies (Oslo Accords 1993 and Liberia Agreement 2003), as well as mediator-interviews with Nigerian Presidents Abubakar and Obasanjo.

 

2015-2016 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Netta Barak-Corren
S.J.D Candidate, Harvard Law School

As a PON Graduate Research Fellow, Netta Barak-Corren will examine why people obey or disobey the law when it conflicts with their religious beliefs, and whether lawmakers can mitigate this conflict in advance. An S.J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School and a research fellow with the Behavioral Insights Group in Harvard Business School, Netta has received numerous awards, including the Sinclair Kennedy traveling fellowship awarded by the president and fellows of Harvard University, the Fisher-Sander award for her thesis, and the Howard Raiffa award for her paper on false negotiations. She was a Pearlman, Gammon and Shapiro scholar and a P.E.O. International Peace Prize recipient. Her research is supported by grants from the Program on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School, and Harvard’s multidisciplinary program on Mind, Brain and Behavior. Netta is also the founder and co-organizer of Harvard’s Empirical Legal Studies group. She received her LLB/BA in Law and in Cognitive Science summa cum laude from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2011. She was valedictorian of her class, and a three-time recipient of the Albert Einstein award. Before starting her doctoral work at Harvard, Netta clerked for the Chief Justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, the Honorable Dorit Beinish.

Michael Baskin
PhD Candidate, International Affairs, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University

Michael Baskin is a PhD Candidate in international affairs at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where his research fields include international negotiation and conflict resolution, as well as energy and resource policy. His dissertation research examines the use of negotiation and conflict resolution by military actors within armed conflict. While at PON, he will analyze and integrate qualitative research, including semi-structured interviews with US military officers regarding their negotiation and engagement experiences while deployed to Afghanistan from 2008-2013.

Michael maintains an avid interest in energy policy, energy public-policy disputes, and climate change negotiations. He recently held an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) fellowship with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the US Department of Energy. There he helped catalyze several veterans initiatives including the Solar Ready Vets program and provided support to the First Lady’s Joining Forces initiative focused on veteran employment, health, and education.

Michael served as a US Army infantry officer for six years with 27 months of service in Afghanistan and Iraq. He holds a BS from the US Military Academy at West Point and studied abroad under the post-9/11 GI Bill for an MA specializing in diplomacy and conflict at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya, Israel.

Yookyoung Kim
PhD Candidate, Management and Organization, University of Southern California

Yookyoung Kim is a PhD candidate in the department of Management and Organization at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on the psychology of scarcity and its impact on competition and negotiation. Using experimental studies, her works examine how individuals think and behave under the influence of scarcity. For example, her research has shown that 1) a scarcity mindset determines what strategy people choose to gain social influence in groups; 2) economic scarcity leads the poor and the rich to have different cognitive processing; and 3) people engage in “dominance-based competition” without a mutual desire for scarce resources, competitive behavior that is motivated by the desire to be superior to other people, rather than to maximize one’s own resources.

She is currently conducting a research project that investigates scarcity effects in negotiation. She has discovered that negotiators pay greater attention to scarce items and consequently scarcity facilitates win-win agreements. However, non-scarce negotiation items do not receive those cognitive resources, and negotiators are less likely to achieve mutually beneficial agreements on those issues. With a series of planned studies, Yookyoung is seeking to understand under what circumstances scarcity benefits or harms negotiators.

Elizabeth Wiley
PhD Candidate, Management, Columbia Business School

Elizabeth Wiley is a Ph.D. candidate in Management at Columbia Business School. As a PON fellow she will study how interpersonal expectations and attributions affect outcomes in negotiations. Her work on expectations investigates the impact of interpersonal cynicism on deception. She finds that negotiators have overly cynical expectations about others’ ethical standards, consistently overestimating the percentage of people who think deception is appropriate in negotiations, and that interpersonal cynicism increases negotiators’ likelihood of engaging in deception. Her research on interpersonal attributions in negotiations explores the value of using precise versus round first offers, the circumstances under which making the first offer leads to a first mover disadvantage, and the effects of silence in negotiations.

Beyond her interest in negotiations research, Elizabeth is invested in advancing negotiations teaching and application. She served as the Columbia Business School Negotiations Fellow from 2013-2014, has coauthored a negotiations case, has co-instructed a negotiations workshop at Columbia College, and regularly acts as a T.A. for the Managerial Negotiations course at Columbia Business School.

Elizabeth graduated magna cum laude from Dartmouth College with a B.A. in Psychology and worked as a consultant prior to graduate school.

 

2014-2015 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Arvid Bell
PhD Candidate, Political Science, Goethe University Frankfurt

Arvid is a PhD scholar at the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt. His dissertation on German and American involvement in the Afghanistan War analyzes how national interests and foreign policy decisions are shaped by negotiations between political decision-makers and their constituents, and by their motives and emotions. At PON, Arvid seeks to conduct case-study interviews with academics and US politicians. His Afghanistan conflict simulation “The Transition” is being used as the capstone exercise of the Advanced Workshop in Multiparty Negotiation and Conflict Resolution at the Harvard Kennedy School. Arvid holds a Franco-German double degree in political science and international affairs from the Free University of Berlin and Paris Institute of Political Studies, as well as a Masters in public policy from Harvard University.

Vera Mironova
PhD candidate, Political Science, University of Maryland

Vera is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Maryland. Her research addresses individual preferences for types of war termination and negotiations in conflicts. While at PON, she will work on her dissertation, using the survey and experimental data she collected from the frontlines in Syria. Focusing on Syria, she asks, to what extent do ordinary civilians and low level combatants have heterogeneous preferences to negotiate with adversaries or fight until victory? (The project has been mentioned by Chicago Tribune, Council on Foreign Relations, The Baltimore Sun, and U-T San Diego). In addition to Syria, she conducted research in the Balkans (Bosnia, Kosovo, and Croatia), Africa (DRC Congo, Burundi, and Rwanda), Caucuses (Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia) and Central Asia (Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Kirgizstan). She holds an MS in computer science, and an MA in economic geography from Moscow State University (Russia). Her PhD study was sponsored by Open Society Institute and her previous research has been published in American Economic Journal: Applied Economics.

Todd Schenk
PhD Candidate, Environmental Policy and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Todd Schenk is a PhD candidate in the Environmental Policy and Planning group of MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and the Assistant Director of the MIT Science Impact Collaborative. Todd’s work focuses on how planners, decision-makers, and other stakeholders can collaboratively make effective decisions in science-intensive situations that involve complex risks and high degrees of uncertainty. His dissertation research focuses on collaboration across institutional boundaries and the use of decision-support tools like scenario planning when making infrastructure planning decisions under climate change. Todd engages with stakeholders via role-play simulation exercises, using the exercises to explore options, tools, approaches, the use of science and data, and the influence of competing interests when making decisions.

Boshko Stankovski
PhD Candidate, Political and International Studies, University of Cambridge

Boshko Stankovski is a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, where he studies as a member of Trinity College. His dissertation is in the field of international law, and deals with issues of sovereignty and conditionality in peace agreements on self-determination and secession disputes. While at PON, he will research secession negotiations, focusing on whether there is a requirement to negotiate secession in international law, as well as on different aspects regarding the conduct of the parties in the negotiation process. He holds a BA in law from the University of Saints Cyril and Methodius (Skopje, Macedonia) and MPhil in international relations from the University of Cambridge, UK.

Abbie Wazlawek
PhD Candidate, Management: Organizational Behavior, Columbia Business School

Abbie is a doctoral student in the management department at Columbia Business School. Her research examines the line that defines the boundaries of appropriate behavior—a line we must be mindful of as we navigate social life in simultaneous pursuit of personal interests and accommodation of others. As a PON fellow, Abbie will explore feedback signals communicated to individuals who assert themselves inappropriately. Additionally, she will examine how a negotiator’s gender affects the concessions they make and the reciprocal accommodation they receive. Abbie’s work has been published in Psychological Science and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. She holds Bachelor’s degrees in psychology and economics from the University of Southern California.

Dana Wolf
PhD Candidate, Public International Law, American University Washington College of Law

Dana is a PhD candidate in public international law at American University Washington College of Law. Her research is on the end of military occupation and its implications for the occupying state. While at PON, Dana will explore the question of the obligations of a once-occupying state toward the formerly occupied territory. Specifically, she will look at whether states might be inclined to voluntarily accept some obligations, as negotiation theory would suggest, on the basis of justifications that would limit those obligations.

Dana holds an LL.B from IDC Herzliya in Israel and an LL.M from NYU’s School of Law where she acted as the Israeli Counsel at NYU’s moot court proceedings on the legality of the Security Fence. Dana served as Adviser at the Permanent Mission of Israel to the United Nations in New York and as Deputy Director of the Yitzhak Rabin Center in Israel. She also practiced criminal litigation at one of Israel’s top law firms.

 

2013-2014 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Alexandros Sarris
PhD Candidate, Public International Law, University of Leiden

Alexandros is a PhD student in Public International Law at the University of Leiden. His research is on whether the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea is a reasonable framework for international disputes regarding fuel resources in the Polar regions, and if a new treaty will appropriately resolve some of the current arguments. During his time at PON, Alexandros will write on the topic of grey zones in negotiations among parties that have international legal and political ramifications. He holds an LL.B. and LL.M. from the Democritus University of Thrace, and was a coach for the Greek Team in the International Law Moot Court Competition from 2007-2009.

Sarah Woodside
PhD Candidate, Sociology, Boston College

Sarah is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at Boston College. Her research is on how individuals in social ventures navigate complex and competing logics, both inside and outside of their organization. While at PON, Sarah will conduct an empirical, qualitative study of eight companies to identify how employees within these companies negotiate among themselves, with their beneficiaries, and with their stakeholders. She has identified these negotiations as key components of their success in creating social transformation and social justice. Sarah is a 2012 Babson College Teaching Innovation Fund Grant recipient, and has been published in Sociology Speaks, Journal of International Negotiation, and Theory in Practice. She holds an M.A. in Dispute Resolution from the University of Massachusetts in Boston.

 

2012-2013 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Alexander E. Kentikelenis, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge
Corinne Low, PhD Candidate, Economics at Columbia University
Alexandra van Geen, Ph.D. Candidate, Public Policy, Harvard University

 

2011-2012 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Jeffrey S. Helmreich, PhD Candidate in Philosophy and Law, University of California-Los Angeles
Rachel Schiller, PhD Candidate at Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University
Chia-Jung Tsay, PhD Candidate in Organizational Behavior, Harvard University

 

2010-2011 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Lakshmi Balachandra, Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Studies, Boston College
Yehonatan Givati, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Economics, Harvard University; S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School
Linn Normand, DPhil Candidate in International Relations at the University of Oxford

 

2009-2010 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellow

Sreedhari D. Desai, Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Behavior, University of Utah

 

2008-2009 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Mohamad Al-Ississ, Ph.D. Candidate in Public Policy Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Zev J. Eigen, Ph.D. Candidate Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Michelle I. Gawerc, Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology Boston College
B. Kelsey Jack, Ph.D. Candidate in Public Policy Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Heather Pincock, Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflicts (PARC), Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

 

2007-2008 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Dipali Mukhopadhyay, Ph.D. Candidate Fletcher School, Tufts University
Andrea L. Strimling, Ph.D. Candidate Fletcher School, Tufts University

 

2006-2007 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Ariel Avgar, Ph.D. Candidate Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations
Alexandra Crampton, Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology and Social Work University of Michigan
Fiona Greig , Ph.D. Candidate in Public Policy and Doctoral Fellow Center for International Development at Harvard University
Carmit Tadmor, Ph.D. Candidate Organizational Behavior and Industrial Relations at the Haas School of Business, University of California at Berkeley

 

2005-2006 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Catherine Ashcraft, Ph.D. Candidate Environmental Policy Group Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Daniel J. Benjamin, Ph.D. Candidate Department of Economics, Harvard University
Dolly Chugh, Ph.D. Candidate Department of Psychology & Harvard Business School
Mara Hernandez, Ph.D. Candidate Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Yuval Procaccia, S.J.D. Candidate Harvard Law School

 

2004-2005 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Zvi Altman, S.J.D Candidate Harvard Law School
Nava Ashraf, Ph.D. Candidate Harvard University, Department of Economics
Ian Wadley, Doctoral Candidate, JSD, Boalt Hall School of Law University of California, Berkeley

 

2003-2004 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Amal Jadou, Ph.D. Candidate The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
Elizabeth Long Lingo, Ph.D. Candidate, Program in Organizational Behavior and Sociology Harvard University and Harvard Business School
Jennifer L. Schulz, S.J.D. Candidate, Faculty of Law University of Toronto

 

2002-2003 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Gabriella Blum,
S.J.D. Candidate Harvard Law School
Pacey Foster, Ph.D. Candidate Boston College
Kessely Hong, Ph.D. Candidate Harvard University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Kennedy School of Government

 

2001-2002 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Michèle Ferenz, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT
Stephen Garcia, Department of Psychology Princeton University
Gregg Macey, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT
Avishalom Tor, Harvard Law School
Noam Wasserman, Harvard Business School

 

2000-2001 Program on Negotiation Graduate Research Fellows

Brian Blancke, Syracuse University
Jason Corburn, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chang In Shin, Pennsylvania State University
Hannah Riley, Harvard Business School
Joshua Weiss, George Mason University

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  • Good morning Sir,

    I am Diekime Egba, a Reintegration staff with the Office of the Special Adviser to the President on Niger Delta/Coordinator, Presidential Amnesty Programme (OSAPND/CPAP) in Nigeria. I am deployed to the department of Peace Building and Conflict Resolution.

    As part of efforts to boost capacity, the department is interested in embarking on a two Week intensive training programme outside Nigeria , and your institution is found worthy of undertaking such a programme. I do not know if you can put up a leadership course that touches on Peace Building or Conflict Resolution.

    Please, kindly revert if your institution can undertake the training so as to enable us communicate formally.

    Yours faithfully,

    Diekime Egba

    Reply
    • Hello,
      We offer Negotiation and Leadership six times per year and the Harvard Negotiation Institute runs during the first two weeks of June. Please visit our website to see the complete course description.

      Reply
  • Julio F.

    Hi
    I would like to make my PhD in International Law at Havard University. Please send me the application forms to apply,
    Iam ready to pay and to come in USA for this course,

    Reply

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