difficult conversation

A framework for describing how to apply interest-based negotiation techniques to conversations and dilemmas in daily life. According to this framework, underlying every difficult conversation are actually three deeper conversations. (Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton and Sheila Heen, Difficult Conversations [Viking/Penguin, 1999], 7). Also see Òthree conversationsÓ.

The following items are tagged difficult conversation.

Issues of Gender in Salary Negotiations: The Negotiation Skills Women Need to Succeed at the Bargaining Table and Beyond

Posted by & filed under Women and Negotiation.

Most negotiators will never engage in the kinds of high-stakes bargaining we read about in publications such as The Wall Street Journal and The Financial Times, but almost every negotiator will encounter the dreaded salary negotiation during the course of her career, a scenario that is, in many ways, the definition of a “difficult conversation.”

We stress preparation for negotiations in our literature and in our Negotiation and Leadership executive education course but both research and experience recognize that even the most prepared and adept negotiator can have her planning and negotiation preparation scuttled by unforeseen circumstances and invisible barriers.

That is why women often encounter difficulty during salary negotiations, according to a recent article by Tara Siegel Bernard for the New York Times. Self-advocating for a pay raise in the workplace often places women in the unenviable role of attempting, “…to juggle when they are on a tight rope.”

Conflict Management at the Office

Posted by & filed under Conflict Management.

Are you too eager to please? A desire to get along with others may be preventing you from addressing conflict in your workplace – and preventing you from advancing, writes Joann S. Lublin in a recent Wall Street Journal article.

Increasingly, employers are hiring and promoting leaders who are skilled at coping with conflict rather than avoiding it, according to Judith Glaser, the author of the new book Conversational Intelligence.

In an attempt to combat a culture of “artificial harmony,” for example, Southwest Airlines is now actively seeking to promote middle managers to executive positions based in part on their ability to bring conflict to the surface and work through it openly.

South Africa’s “Negotiated Revolution” and Mandela’s Legacy: A Conversation with Roelf Meyer and Tim Phillips

Posted by & filed under Events.

Rm and Phillips

The Program on Negotiation is pleased to present:

South Africa’s “Negotiated Revolution” and Mandela’s Legacy
with
Roelf Meyer
Former Chief Negotiator for President DeKlerk in the talks to end Apartheid
Former Minister of Constitutional Affairs and Former Minister of Defense, South Africa
and
Tim Phillips
Co-Founder of Beyond Conflict (formerly the Project on Justice in Times of Transition)
Moderated by

Bruce Patton
Distinguished Fellow of

Negotiation Skills: Giving Feedback. Who Needs It? It Might Be You

Posted by & filed under Negotiation Skills.

A Q&A with Sheila Heen, co-author (with Douglas Stone) of the new book, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well.

We recently interviewed Sheila Heen, lecturer at Harvard Law School, PON Faculty member, and Partner at Triad Consulting Group, about her new book with Douglas Stone, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered, and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood). Heen and Stone are co-authors, along with Bruce Patton, of the New York Times Business Bestseller Difficult Conversations. They have teamed up again to share their insights about what helps people learn and what gets in their way.

While the business world spends billions of dollars and millions of hours each year teaching us how to give feedback, Stone and Heen argue that we’ve got it backwards. Their new book demonstrates why the smart money is on educating receivers— both in the workplace and in personal relationships.

Doug Stone and Sheila Heen’s new book “Thanks for the Feedback” – Book Discussion and Signing

Posted by & filed under Events, harvard negotiation project.

9780670922611

Join us as Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project discuss their latest book, Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well. This event is hosted by the Harvard Book Store.
 

 
Tuesday, March 4th
6:00 – 7:30 PM
Brattle Theatre
40 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA
Entry is $5 – buy your tickets here.
 

We swim

Women and Career Negotiations

Posted by & filed under 1 Day Courses, executive training.

Women negotiating for career rewards face a dilemma: they must weigh the benefits of negotiating against the social consequences of having negotiated. This highly focused program, offered for the very first time, is designed to help women develop individual strategies for improving both their negotiation and social outcomes in career negotiations.

Practical Lessons from the Great Negotiators

Posted by & filed under 1 Day Courses, executive training.

How did Bruce Wasserstein, former Chairman and CEO of Lazard and one of the most successful dealmakers of all time, negotiate more than a thousand transactions worth hundreds of billions of dollars?

How did artists Christo and Jean-Claude overcome the objections of four mayors, as well as numerous boards and New York City residents, to pull off one of the greatest public (and controversial) public art installations of all time throughout Central Park?

How did Finnish President Marti Ahtisaari’s negotiation efforts lead to Kosovo’s independence and help end a decades-long, bloody conflict? Ten times, the Program on Negotiation has bestowed “The Great Negotiator Award” on an individual who has successfully negotiated against great odds to accomplish a worthy goal. In this fascinating, one-day session, you will have the rare opportunity to explore how these award recipients negotiated to overcome some of their most formidable challenges.

Conflict Resolution Lessons from the Home: How Conflict Management Skills Transform Discord Into Harmony

Posted by & filed under Conflict Resolution.

In Lessons in Life Diplomacy, the New York Times’ Bruce Feiler asks, how do we break out of negative patterns of conduct and proactively approach problems encountered in our everyday lives? His advice, gleaned from his own experiences as well as from the research of experts in the field of conflict management and dispute resolution, is actually quite simple on its face yet very complex in practice.

Think Like a Mediator

Posted by & filed under Mediation.

To set the stage for a productive discussion, open a difficult conversation with the Third Story, advise the authors of Difficult Conversations. The Third Story is one an impartial observer, such as a mediator, would tell; it’s a version of events both sides can agree on. “The key is learning to describe the gap – or difference – between your story and the other person’s story. Whatever else you may think and feel, you can at least agree that you and the other person see things differently,” Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen write.

Negotiation and Leadership: Dealing with Difficult People and Problems

Posted by & filed under Executive Education Seminars (3 Day Courses), executive training.

This course examines core decision-making challenges, analyzes complex negotiation scenarios, and provides a range of competitive and cooperative negotiation strategies. Whether you’re an experienced executive or and up-and-coming manager – working in the private or public sector – this program will help you shape important deals, negotiate in uncertain environments, improve working relationships, claim (and create) more value, and resolve seemingly intractable disputes. In short, this three-day executive education program will prepare you to achieve better outcomes at the table, every single time.